mymindpalaceisatardis:

High-five for open minded people

(Source: ssanra)

"

10 BETTER BODY AFFIRMATIONS FOR YOUNG WOMEN


1. Your body is in flux for the rest of your life. Think of your body as fluid instead of static — it’s always going to change. So get comfortable with those changes.

2. No one will love you or not love you because of your body. You are lovable because you’re you, not because your body looks a certain way.

3. The most intensely personal relationship you’ll ever have is with your body. It’s a lifelong relationship that’s well worth investing in and nurturing the same way you would with loved ones.

4. You don’t owe your body to anyone. Not sexually, not aesthetically. Your body is yours. Period.

5. What someone else says about your body says more about them than it does about you. Look past the actual snark to the person who’s saying it, because it’s only a reflection of what they think of themselves. That’s when you’ll see how little power their words have.

6. Your body is not a reflection of your character. It’s a physical home for the complex and wondrous and unique being that is you.

7. Take up as much space as you want. You don’t have to be small, or quiet, or docile, regardless of your physical size.

8. Everything you need to accept your body is already inside you. There’s no book, or diet, or workout routine or external affirmation that you need to feel good about your body right now.

9. Your body is a priority. It’s always trying to tell you things. Taking the time to listen to is of the utmost importance.

10. Wear whatever you want. Your body shape does not dictate your personal style, and fashion rules that say otherwise are wrong. Dress yourself in a way that makes you feel happy and confident and beautiful, because guess what? You are.

"
"The reality is that fat people are often supported in hating their bodies, in starving themselves, in engaging in unsafe exercise, and in seeking out weight loss by any means necessary. A thin person who does these things is considered mentally ill. A fat person who does these things is redeemed by them. This is why our culture has no concept of a fat person who also has an eating disorder. If you’re fat, it’s not an eating disorder — it’s a lifestyle change."

Lesley Kinzel (via curvesahead)

I will always reblog this because it is so so important. 

(via infinitetransit)

I just want to nail this to every stable surface I can find. I cannot count the amount of times that I’ve seen fat folks being encouraged, cajoled, and even forced into behaviors that would be recognized as disordered eating/exercising patterns in thin folks. 

Pretty much everything that’s done on shows like The Biggest Loser would be called out as pro-ana/pro-orthorexia in a thin person. Exercising past the point that it hurts, to the point where you’re throwing up, even injuring yourself? Berating yourself because you didn’t lose ENOUGH weight this week? Constantly talking about how fat is weakness and thinness will make everything better, about how you can’t stand to be your current weight anymore? Emphasis on weight as a sign of how much control, strength, and worth you have? Viewing food as bad, as a temptation to sin? Constant sharing and talking about tips on how to minimize food intake, how to lose weight? 

That sounds exactly like every pro-ana/pro-mia blog I’ve ever seen. It’s also what fat people are told we need to be doing to ourselves until we’re thin. 

(via madamethursday)

I’VE BEEN SAYING THIS FOR A LONG TIME THAT EATING DISORDERS AND SELF-HARM AND SELF-HATE ARE ENCOURAGED IN FAT PEOPLE.

(via locsgirl)

(Source: xojane.com)

lacigreen:

a point has been made

(Source: fallontonight)

chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 
chandra75:

George Takei,
You rule. 

chandra75:

George Takei,

You rule. 

englishistheartofbullshit:

submissivefeminist:

If you think this isn’t the damn truth you should know that a few years back, my campus newspaper ran an article that said fat women should be grateful for rape because it’s the only way they’ll ever feel worthy of a man’s attention.

I shit you not.

yeah, I’ve been told on multiple occasions during casual conversations that I’m not pretty/skinny enough to be raped, so that’s a thing

(Source: marfmellow)

(Source: guykneecologist)

seriouslyamerica:

stfusexists:

myphoria:

Check out the contrast between these search results. Not a single “loser”, “easy”, “desperate”, “stupid”, “scum” or similar insult in the search results for fathers.

Why, society, are single fathers so often seen with sympathy and admiration, yet single mothers are painted as a washed-up, disgusting strain on the system?

This is fucked.

I know this is rhetorical, but we know the reason.
Motherhood is not valued in this country, it’s demanded. We have people fighting tooth and nail against abortion, birth control, and then any social program that helps poor mothers. If the world sees you as a woman, you are expected to desire, birth, and raise children, and if you don’t do that, or you do it while poor, or single, or not white, you’re not only failing as a woman but as a mother.
But men, they don’t get defined by their reproductive abilities! They get to be multi-dimensional! And if they spare an occasional thought for the children they brought into the world, it’s a cherry on top of their identity as a person.
Women don’t get the luxury of existing as people outside of parenting, even in 2013. And until we do, this is the shit we’ll be dealing with.

"Motherhood is not valued in this country, it’s demanded."

"

What will you gain when you lose?

Well, Special K, I gained self-confidence
when I lost the first 10 pounds.

I gained an addiction when I lost
the next thirty.

I gained the horrid feeling deep in my
empty stomach when I started to lose my hair.

When I finally reached recovery,
I gained the confidence to lose my eating disorder.
I no longer judge my worth in proportion to my weight.

"
— Michelle K., Dear Special K. (via michellekpoems)

(Source: sandandglass)